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iCalc solves faster.

Put time-consuming hand-calculations in the past.

THE ICALC PRODUCT SUITE INCLUDES THE FOLLOWING APPLETS:

DESIGN CRITERIA

Calculate NFPA 13 required density and area of sprinkler operation.

  • Account for light hazard, ordinary hazard groups 1 and 2, and extra hazard groups 1 and 2.
  • Automates the process of applying exceptions and adjustments per NFPA 13.
  • Not a replacement for sound engineering knowledge, but a tool to account for most situations.
  • Graph displays NFPA 13 curves, and indication for the system requirement on NFPA 13 density curve.
  • Great for designers to select correct Density and Area of Sprinkler Operation as required by NFPA 13. The printout can be used as part of record keeping and submittal process.
  • Great for quality control operation ensuring various credits and penalties are accounted for.
  • Great for Authorities Having Jurisdiction (AHJ) in ensuring the design submitted complies with NFPA 13 regulations. The Applet lists NFPA 13 applicable sections (regulation) which can be used for preparation of the review comments letter.
  • Great for engineer/owner, as part of overall risk analysis, in analyzing the impact of the change in occupancy classification, ceiling height, change in type of system, and changes in type of sprinklers being used.

FIXTURE COUNT

Calculate required plumbing fixtures per floor.

Gets the required number of fixtures in a quick and easy way, at the beginning of your design process.

  • References IBC and IPC 2012
  • Automatically combines all occupancies into one report
  • Simplifies collating your plumbing requirements and gives you a ready to read report

HYDRO GRAPH

Evaluate system demand vs. supply on an exponetial graph.

  • Water supply can consist of city/storage tower, just a pump, or both.
  • Printout displays graphically how system demand compares with available water supply.
  • Great for designers as part of hydraulic calculation submittal required by NFPA 13.
  • Great for Authorities Having Jurisdiction (AHJ) to analyze the changes in water supply at various times of the year and day.
  • Great for owners, as part of overall risk analysis, to provide safety factors as well as 'what-if' scenarios.
  • Great for inspectors/insurance reps for verification of the impact of current flow tests on system

FRICTION LOSS

Calculate pressure lost to friction across a system.

Computes friction loss in a system using the Hazen Williams formula. Allows for calculating losses through:

  • Branch lines
  • Cross main
  • Bulk main
  • Underground piping, including fire sprinkler service and yard main piping to test hydrant

Ports your input data automatically from Water Supply. Also works as a standalone applet.

This applet is great for:

  • Designers--estimate the most economical sprinkler system layout with given water supply.
  • Quality Control--ensuring all required losses are accounted for.
  • Great for Authorities Having Jurisdiction (AHJ)--quick checking of sprinkler design submittal.
  • Great for engineer/owner--as part of overall cost impact, if on-site water supply and/or fire pump are required.
  • Inspector/Insurance Rep--verify the impact of current flow tests.

DARCY WEISBACH

Calculate pressure lost to friction across a system.

This applet functions the same as friction loss, but uses the darcy-weisbach formula instead.

NFPA 13 requires the use of darcy weisbach in antifreeze systems, especially over 40 gallons of capacity. This is due to the higher viscosity of these systems.

WATER SUPPLY EVALUATION

Determine adequacy of water supply, determine if a pump is required.

Helps in ensuring there is adequate water supply available to meet the demand of the proposed sprinkler system. Helps in answering the following questions:

  • Is on-site storage tank required?
  • Is a fire pump or booster fire pump required?

Further analysis can be done using the Friction Loss applet, which ports your input data automatically from Water Supply.

This applet saves considerable time, without preparing an entire system piping layout or performing detailed calculations.

This applet is great for:

  • Designers--a quick tool to verify available water supply is adequate for the proposed sprinkler system before spending time in designing of the system and estimate the most economical sprinkler system layout with given water supply.
  • Quality Control--ensuring all required losses are accounted for.
  • Great for Authorities Having Jurisdiction (AHJ)--quick checking of sprinkler design submittal.
  • Great for engineer/owner--as part of overall project feasibility analysis and cost impact, if on-site water supply and/or fire pump are required.
  • Inspector/Insurance Rep--verify the impact of current flow tests on proposed new or existing system.

TRAPEZE HANGERS

Compare required and provided section modulus.

One of our tools, but a big time saver.

Based on the size and type of pipe being hung from the trapeze member, the location of the attachment to the member, and the spacing of the members, the required section modulus of the member is calculated and displayed.

This applet is great for:

  • Fire sprinkler designer for selection of correct sizing of trapeze hanger assembly.
  • Engineer/Owner ensuring sprinkler piping is adequately supported and how it may impact the building structure.

PUMP TEST

Compare a pump’s performance to its rating. References affinity laws.

Compare the performance of the fire pump “as installed” condition to the manufacturer’s “shop certified performance”. This law is commonly referred to as "adjusting the speed". It is also used to satisfy NFPA 25 “pass/fail” criteria.

Plots the shop certified performance curve and the field tested performance curve for visual evaluation, and displays the results of the affinity law calculation for numerical evaluation.

On the same graph, the combined, tested, city curve is plotted, along with the system demand curve for a complete visual and numerical evaluation of pump test performance in accordance with NFPA 25.

This applet is great for:

  • Engineer/Owner as part of system acceptance ensuring the pump performs as stated in manufacturer’s data sheet
  • Fire sprinkler designer ensuring the pump delivers required flow and pressure
  • AHJ to ensure information provided in submittals is valid

FIRE FLOW

Determine independent fire flow requirements based on 2012 IFC appendix B.

Fire flow is the flow of water at 20 PSI at the site. Fire-Flow is independent of flow required of sprinkler system--although having a fully sprinklered facility does reduce the volume of Fire flow.

IFC 2012 section 507.3 requires the fire flow to be determined by an approved method subject to the Authority Having Jurisdiction. Section B103 of IFC authorizes fire chief to decrease or increase the fire flow.F ire Flow is a calculation tool and must be used along with good engineering practice; it does not replace actual engineering knowledge and practice.

Fire-flow is dependent upon the fire area, construction type, occupancy type, and sprinkler protection.

Once determined, a flow test must be conducted to ensure adequate volume (GPM) of water is available at 20 residual pressure for fire flow or the flow required by the sprinkler system plus hose allowance, whichever is higher. This can be verified using our Flow Test, Water Supply, and Friction Loss Applets.

This applet is great for:

  • Engineer/Owner--as part of overall cost impact, if on-site water supply and/or fire pump are required
  • Quality Control operation--ensuring AHJ is satisfied with the site selection before proceeding with the selected site.
  • Authority Having Jurisdiction (AHJ)--quick checking of IFC requirements are met or not.

FLOW TEST

Document results obtained during actual flow test.

NFPA 13 requires a flow test must be conducted no more than 12 months prior to submittal of fire sprinkler system. NFPA 291 is the referenced standard in conducting actual test.

Flow test is needed for:

  • Design of sprinkler system.
  • Verify any deficiency such as closed valve or tuberculation of piping.
  • Marking of fire hydrants

Calculates flow from flowing hydrant per pitot Pressure taking account of discharge coefficient. Allows for auto-location and date/time logging.

This applet is great for:

  • Engineer/Owner, at the beginning of the project to ensure adequate water supply is available for the planned project.
  • Fire sprinkler designer for designing of the sprinkler system.
  • Water Purveyor in verification of pressure fluctuation during different times/days/seasons.
  • AHJ to ensure information provided in submittals is valid.
  • Property maintenance personnel and inspector to check if there is any deterioration in water supply.

STANDPIPE

Determine requirements for a standpipe system. References NFPA 14

NFPA 14 is the installation standard that governs standpipe and hose systems. The building code normally dictates when standpipes are required and NFPA 14 provides design and installation guidelines. Most jurisdictions adopt NFPA 14 as part of their adopted code ordinance and possibly modify some of its requirements. Therefore, it is important to consult the AHJ on the following as a minimum:

  1. Codes & Standards: Editions along with adopted modifications.
  2. Minimum pressure and flow required at the remote hose valve.
  3. Confirmation of manual, automatic, or semi-automatic standpipe.
  4. The ability of fire department to provide required volume and pressure available at fire department connection (FDC) for a manual type standpipe.

This standpipe Applet is a tool that navigates one through the provisions of NFPA 14; it is not intended to be used as a replacement for good Engineering practice. Also, always consult local AHJ before using the results provided by the Applet.

The standpipe system piping is sized to deliver required gallons of water at the prescribed pressure at the most remote fire department hose valve. Refer to NFPA 14 for an exact definition of the terms used in the Applet. Standpipe systems can be of the Automatic, Semi-Automatic, or Manual type and can be set up as a combined system supplying fire sprinklers as well as hose connections. Standpipes are classified as either Class I, II, and III and their use are generally prescribed by the building code.

STANDPIPE

Determine requirements for a standpipe system. References NFPA 14

NFPA 14 is the installation standard that governs standpipe and hose systems. The building code normally dictates when standpipes are required and NFPA 14 provides design and installation guidelines. Most jurisdictions adopt NFPA 14 as part of their adopted code ordinance and possibly modify some of its requirements. Therefore, it is important to consult the AHJ on the following as a minimum:

  1. Codes & Standards: Editions along with adopted modifications.
  2. Minimum pressure and flow required at the remote hose valve.
  3. Confirmation of manual, automatic, or semi-automatic standpipe.
  4. The ability of fire department to provide required volume and pressure available at fire department connection (FDC) for a manual type standpipe.

This standpipe Applet is a tool that navigates one through the provisions of NFPA 14; it is not intended to be used as a replacement for good Engineering practice. Also, always consult local AHJ before using the results provided by the Applet.

The standpipe system piping is sized to deliver required gallons of water at the prescribed pressure at the most remote fire department hose valve. Refer to NFPA 14 for an exact definition of the terms used in the Applet. Standpipe systems can be of the Automatic, Semi-Automatic, or Manual type and can be set up as a combined system supplying fire sprinklers as well as hose connections. Standpipes are classified as either Class I, II, and III and their use are generally prescribed by the building code.

STANDPIPE

Determine requirements for a standpipe system. References NFPA 14

NFPA 14 is the installation standard that governs standpipe and hose systems. The building code normally dictates when standpipes are required and NFPA 14 provides design and installation guidelines. Most jurisdictions adopt NFPA 14 as part of their adopted code ordinance and possibly modify some of its requirements. Therefore, it is important to consult the AHJ on the following as a minimum:

  1. Codes & Standards: Editions along with adopted modifications.
  2. Minimum pressure and flow required at the remote hose valve.
  3. Confirmation of manual, automatic, or semi-automatic standpipe.
  4. The ability of fire department to provide required volume and pressure available at fire department connection (FDC) for a manual type standpipe.

This standpipe Applet is a tool that navigates one through the provisions of NFPA 14; it is not intended to be used as a replacement for good Engineering practice. Also, always consult local AHJ before using the results provided by the Applet.

The standpipe system piping is sized to deliver required gallons of water at the prescribed pressure at the most remote fire department hose valve. Refer to NFPA 14 for an exact definition of the terms used in the Applet. Standpipe systems can be of the Automatic, Semi-Automatic, or Manual type and can be set up as a combined system supplying fire sprinklers as well as hose connections. Standpipes are classified as either Class I, II, and III and their use are generally prescribed by the building code.

STANDPIPE

Determine requirements for a standpipe system. References NFPA 14

NFPA 14 is the installation standard that governs standpipe and hose systems. The building code normally dictates when standpipes are required and NFPA 14 provides design and installation guidelines. Most jurisdictions adopt NFPA 14 as part of their adopted code ordinance and possibly modify some of its requirements. Therefore, it is important to consult the AHJ on the following as a minimum:

  1. Codes & Standards: Editions along with adopted modifications.
  2. Minimum pressure and flow required at the remote hose valve.
  3. Confirmation of manual, automatic, or semi-automatic standpipe.
  4. The ability of fire department to provide required volume and pressure available at fire department connection (FDC) for a manual type standpipe.

This standpipe Applet is a tool that navigates one through the provisions of NFPA 14; it is not intended to be used as a replacement for good Engineering practice. Also, always consult local AHJ before using the results provided by the Applet.

The standpipe system piping is sized to deliver required gallons of water at the prescribed pressure at the most remote fire department hose valve. Refer to NFPA 14 for an exact definition of the terms used in the Applet. Standpipe systems can be of the Automatic, Semi-Automatic, or Manual type and can be set up as a combined system supplying fire sprinklers as well as hose connections. Standpipes are classified as either Class I, II, and III and their use are generally prescribed by the building code.

Pricing:


Basic

  • $500 per year
  • 1-2 seats
  • All Applets excluding Storage
  • Email support

Business

  • $3,000 per year
  • 6-9 seats
  • All Applets including Storage
  • Email and phone support